The Deadlift

Whether your fitness goals are to improve athletic performance, gain strength, increase lean body mass, rehabilitate your back, or just maintain functional independence as you age – the deadlift is universal.

By Tory Gray March 28, 2016
Posted in  Training

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Deadlift

The deadlift, like the squat, is a one of the most important foundational movements of the human body.  Many years ago, it was referred to as the “healthlift” being that it is the perfect lift for your general health and well being.  Whether your fitness goals are to improve athletic performance, gain strength, increase lean body mass, rehabilitate your back, or just maintain functional independence as you age – it is universal. It’s for anyone and anybody to help improve general physical ability.

The deadlift is a safe and proper approach on how an object should be lifted from the ground.

  • Feet vertical jump stance mid-foot directly under hip joint), toes angled slightly out.
  • Shins about an inch from the bar, over the midfoot or pinky toe.
  • push your knees out very slightly. This keeps your thighs lined up with your slightly pointed-out toes and allows your groin muscles and lateral hip muscles to engage during the pull.
  • Grip just outside the legs (mixed grip or parallel grip).
  • Hips up and shoulders in front of the bar; shoulders pinned back and down, contracting your lats and triceps so they press against each other.
  • Squeeze your chest up (thoracic spine extension)
  • Back flat and core tight (this requires strength of your lumbar erectors, which can be built up by doing heavy deadlifts done correctly).
  • The bar path should be perfectly vertical. A good indicator if it is, is it will make contact with your legs all the way up. We call this “dragging.”

Deadlifts

Remember, don’t complicate the movement. You are not trying to squat the weight off the floor gripping the bar in your hands. Instead, you are squeezing your chest up, raising your shoulders and hips at the same speed, while keeping the bar path completely vertical throughout the movement.  The simplest method is the smartest method and when done properly and often, you will help protect your back from potential injury.

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